STOP WAGE THEFT.

Protect PAGA.

Protect Workers!

Everywhere we turn, big corporations are ripping us off. We are already being gouged at the grocery store and the gas station – now these greedy companies are trying to steal directly from our paychecks.
To protect workers, California lawmakers should pass AB 2288 (Kalra) that strengthens PAGA by giving courts use of injunctive relief against corporate bad actors – stopping corporate wage theft and other abuse in its tracks. Learn more here.

When corporations don’t pay us for all the hours we worked, refuse to pay overtime, or pay less than the minimum wage – that’s wage theft and it’s against the law. California has one of the nation’s strongest laws in place to prevent wage theft and allow workers to collectively enforce their rights.

BIG CORPORATIONS take aim at our paychecks 

California’s lobbying interests for Big Tobacco, Wall Street Banks, Big Pharma, and other giant corporate interests want to rewrite the law so they can keep their workers’ pay.
Wells Fargo logo
GlaxoSmithKline logo

Wage theft is an equity issue

It’s the very workers who helped us get through the COVID-19 pandemic – frontline workers in fast food restaurants, grocery, agriculture, and other low-wage jobs – that are most vulnerable to wage theft.  Many are people of color who risked their lives while corporations laughed all the way to the bank. 

California’s Black and Brown workers will be harmed most if corporations succeed in undermining wage theft laws. Worker victims shared their stories with CalMatters for an eight-part series on the devastating impact wage theft has had on their lives. Read the full story here.

Mayra at the San Fransisco Bay in San Francisco. Photo by Julie A. Hotz for CalMatters/CatchLight
Mayra at the San Fransisco Bay in San Francisco. Photo by Julie A. Hotz for CalMatters/CatchLight

Mayra Perez worked as a janitor in San Francisco. Even though she worked eight hour days, her employer would only pay her for five hours. “Employers don’t know that we also have a lot of family behind us…they do not stop to think that by stealing wages, they are contributing so that society continues to live in poverty.”

Victor Pedroza, an immigrant who came to the United States from Mexico 24 years ago, got his start cleaning commercial buildings in Orange County. His employers took advantage of Victor’s unfamiliarity with US labor laws, paying him below minimum wage. “We brought our check stubs, everything we could collect and we showed them and (the advocacy organization) actually told us there was wage theft.”

Victor Pedroza in Garden Grove. Photo and audio by Pablo Unzueta for CalMatters/CatchLight
Victor Pedroza in Garden Grove. Photo and audio by Pablo Unzueta for CalMatters/CatchLight
Photo by Pablo Unzueta for CalMatters/CatchLight
Photo by Pablo Unzueta for CalMatters/CatchLight

Andrea Pedroza, Victor Pedroza’s spouse, worked alongside her husband as a janitor in Orange County. She became a victim of wage theft when her employer paid her less than California’s minimum wage. “I fell into such a great depression that I would cry every day, because we didn’t have money for rent, bills, or food.”

Worker #1, who works in the electric car industry, says her employer has stolen three months of unpaid wages. It’s not the first time she has experienced wage theft, having filed disputes in the software and nonprofit industries. “People think that wage theft happens mostly to low-wage earners in the restaurant industry, or car washes, or construction sites or day laborers. And that is just not the case.”

Anonymous in Pleasanton. Photo and audio by Felix Uribe for CalMatters/CatchLight
Anonymous in Pleasanton. Photo and audio by Felix Uribe for CalMatters/CatchLight
Scroll to Top